Generic Lipitor

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 10mg

$0.56

per tablet

360 tablet Price: $199.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 10mg

$0.67

per tablet

180 tablet Price: $119.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 20mg

$0.74

per tablet

360 tablet Price: $264.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 10mg

$0.75

per tablet

120 tablet Price: $89.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 20mg

$0.83

per tablet

180 tablet Price: $149.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 10mg

$0.89

per tablet

90 tablet Price: $79.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 10mg

$0.92

per tablet

60 tablet Price: $54.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 40mg

$0.94

per tablet

360 tablet Price: $339.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 20mg

$1.00

per tablet

120 tablet Price: $119.95

generic lipitor
atorvastatin 10mg

$1.00

per tablet

30 tablet Price: $29.95

    Warning: actual item appearance may differ from image shown.

    Atorvastatin
    Lipitor
    CTR,Lipitor
    Attor,Agitor,Lupicure,Soraton

    *By clicking "Order Now" button you will be redirected to the website where you will be able to make purchase Lipitor, we are only affiliate marketing and price comparison site. We have no authority or control to provide you with a cancellation or refund.

    HUMAN GENOME PROJECT

     

    HUMAN GENOME PROJECT
    Mapping ourselves

    Genes - 'Software' for your body's cells

    In essence, genes are software for the cells of your body. The messages they send control virtually every aspect of how your body functions.

    Within the nucleus of most cells, complex genetic instructions - called the human genome - are contained on 23 pairs of chromosomes. Chromosomes are composed mostly of long threads of a chemical called deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), coiled tightly inside the cells. Each chromosome carries thousands of genes arranged like beads on a string. Genes are simply short pieces of DNA that contain information telling the cell what proteins to produce and thereby how to act.

    These hereditary instructions are spelled out in a code that can be represented by four letters, each corresponding to one of the chemicals, called bases, that make up DNA: adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C), and guanine (G).

    A DNA molecule consists of two strands wound to resemble a twisted ladder. The "sides" of the ladder are made of sugar and phosphate molecules and are connected by the "rungs," composed of pairs of bases. Strict base-pairing rules exist. For example, adenine will pair only with thymine (an A-T pair) and cytosine with guanine (a C-G pair).

    During cell division, the DNA molecule unwinds and the weak bonds between the base pairs break, allowing the sides to separate. Each side then directs the synthesis of a complementary new strand.

    If the DNA language gets garbled or a misspelling occurs in the code, the cell may make a wrong protein, or too much or too little of the correct one. These glitches may cause disease. In some cases, such as sickle cell anemia, a single misplaced base is enough to cause disease.

    Altered genes also are known to play a role in increasing a person's risk of developing a disease or condition. For example, the interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors, including diet and lifestyle, figures in the development of cancer, heart disease and many other common diseases.

    The human genome encompasses all the genetic material in a human cell - it's the stuff that makes you - you.

    HGP and disease

    The tools needed to treat the genes involved in both rare and common diseases likely will be developed by the HGP over the next 20 years. These discoveries will lead to improved early detection and treatment of disease as well as new approaches to prevention.

    Single gene defects are responsible for an estimated 4,000 diseases that clearly have a hereditary component. According to Dr. Russell, treating disease on a genetic basis, or gene therapy, involves three main areas:

    * Replacing a missing gene that causes problems like a buildup of thick mucous in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis.

    * Injecting a gene into cells so that the body makes a missing protein or one produced in too small a quantity.

    * Injecting a gene into cells that produces a protein that either kills cells, such as cancer cells, or causes them to be susceptible to a drug that kills cells.

    "The potential is absolutely enormous," says Dr. Russell, who oversees Mayo Clinic's gene therapy program. "Every common disease is now the subject of some study developing a new gene therapy approach. And gene therapy can substitute for drug therapy in virtually any area you choose. Some have predicted that 20 percent of the world' s pharmaceuticals will be gene-therapy agents by the year 2010."

    The future of biology, medicine

    The mapping of the genome sequence will be the primary information source for human biology and medicine far into the future. The data produced in the mapping of the human genome would fill an estimated 1,000 books the size of the Manhattan telephone directory (1000 pages each). Reading it would take an estimated 26 years working around the clock.

    Development of tools such as automated fluorescent-based DNA sequencing has resulted in a quadrupling of the pace of discovery in the HGP.

    Prior to the HGP, scientists had to look at all the chromosomes to find a gene - a process that used to take up to 10 years. The HGP is designed to speed the process by creating maps of each chromosome and, ultimately, to decode - letter by letter - the exact sequence of all 3 billion bases that make up the human genome. Researchers from biology, physics, engineering, and computer science are all contributing to the effort.

     






The information contained on this site are personal opinions and not medical advice or treatment. If you need medical advice or treatment, consult your own pharmacist or doctor.
MoonLakeRx.com is an information service only. We do not sell the products listed on our site.
All product names, trademarks, trade names, trade dress, and logos appearing on the site are the property of their respective owners